NOBEL PRIZE MUSEUM

The artwork “CYKLOTRON” is a celebration of the cyclotron particle accelerator through a large-scale light installation along the building’s curved facade.

The artist was inspired by the 1939 Nobel Prize in Physics that was awarded to Ernest Orlando Lawrence for “the invention and development of the cyclotron and for results obtained with it, especially with regard to artificial radioactive elements.”

Even though newer technology has been created, the cyclotron is still a common research tool and is also used in a lot of modern medicine, including cancer treatment. The iconic curved facade of Bofills båge inspired the artist to think about particle accelerators. By illuminating the building he hopes to bring light to the influence Lawrence’s work has had in modern medicine and research.

Jim Farula (United States)

Jim Farula (United States)

Jim Farula is an American architect that ran a business in the US designing and building self sustaining homes. After relocating to Sweden he has expanded more into lighting programming and now also lighting design.

Jim Farula (United States)

Jim Farula (United States)

Jim Farula is an American architect that ran a business in the US designing and building self sustaining homes. After relocating to Sweden he has expanded more into lighting programming and now also lighting design.

This artwork is supported by