The artwork Colour Your World is a colourful, playful and mesmerizing experience, developed through an experimental cooperation between the artist and ninety students in the 4th grade at Södermalmsskolan.

The artwork is inspired by the visual impressions from a kaleidoscope, integrating patterns based on the simple joy of colours, light phenomenons and our ability to see. In a collaborative workshop the children constructed kaleidoscopes and made patterns that the artist has developed into this light artwork.

The artist was inspired by two Nobel Prize awarded discoveries that relate to how the eye processes visual information, in particular light and colour.

Ragnar Granit was awarded the medicine prize in 1967 for “the discoveries concerning the primary physiological and chemical visual processes in the eye” and Sir Chandrasekhara Venkata Raman was awarded the physics prize 1930 for “his work on the scattering of light and for the discovery of the effect named after him”.

These large-scale projections of images made by children are also an exploration of ownership of public space. The artwork asks: Who gets to express themselves in the urban environment. Who colours our world?

IRINA MY (Sweden)

IRINA MY (Sweden)

Irina My is a multidisciplinary artist based in Stockholm, working with art in public space, light installation, and light design. With a passion for colour and details her work has a characteristic of narrative shapes and striking patterns. 

This artwork is a collaboration between the artist Irina My, the children and teachers at Södermalmsskolan and the educational department at the Nobel Prize Museum.

IRINA MY (Sweden)

IRINA MY (Sweden)

Irina My is a multidisciplinary artist based in Stockholm, working with art in public space, light installation, and light design. With a passion for colour and details her work has a characteristic of narrative shapes and striking patterns. 

This artwork is a collaboration between the artist Irina My, the children and teachers at Södermalmsskolan and the educational department at the Nobel Prize Museum.